USS Elliot DD-967

My Tour of duty

28 March 1977 - 30 May 1981

NOTE:   The information found here was taken from the official Cruise Book I received before I left the command and reflects the ELLIOT from that period.

a line

USS Elliot DD-967
USS Elliot DD-967

NOTE:   I was assigned temporary duty to the USS Badger FF-1071 while serving aboard the USS Elliot.

DD 967 (1976-81)

DD 967 (198? - 2003)

Displacement: 9,300 t. (full load)
Length: 563' 4"
Beam: 55'
Draft: 28.9 feet (8.8 meters)
Speed: 33 k.
Complement:
    Officers 18
    CPO 17
    Enlisted 250
Armament:
    2 5" 54Cal.Gun Mounts
    MK 112 ASROC Launcher
    Mk 29 NATO Sea Sparrow missile launcher
    2 MK 32 Torpedo Tubes
Aircraft:
    SH-2F LAMPS helicopters
Class: SPRUANCE
Displacement: 9,300 t. (full load)
Length: 563' 4"
Beam: 55'
Draft: 28.9 feet (8.8 meters)
Speed: 33 k.
Complement:
    Officers 18
    CPO 17
    Enlisted 250
Armament:
    2 5" 54Cal.Gun Mounts
    Mk 41 Vertical Launching System
    Mk 29 NATO Sea Sparrow missile launcher
    2 Mk 15 Phalanx 20mm Close-In Weapons Systems
    2 MK 32 Triple Torpedo Tubes
    2 MK 38 25mm chain guns
    4 12.7mm MG
Aircraft:
    SH-60B Seahawk helicopters
Class: SPRUANCE

Heritage of USS ELLIOT

The USS ELLIOT is the first ship of the SPRUANCE class to be named after a Vietnam War Hero. Lieutenant Commander Arthur James Elliot, II, the son of Mr. And Mrs. Albert B. Elliot of Thomaston, Maine, was born April 9, 1933. He received a Bachelor of Science degree from Gorham State Teachers College in Gorham, Maine in 1955. In June of 1956, he entered the Navy Officer Candidate School, and was commissioned an ensign in the Naval Reserve in October of that year. He then served successive sea duty tours on USS LYMAN K. SWENSON (DD 729) and on USS LITTLE ROCK (CLG 4). In 1962 Lieutenant Commander Elliot was assigned as Aide and Flag Lieutenant to Commander, Naval Service Forces, U.S. Pacific Fleet. Upon completion of this tour, he reported for duty as Operations Officer aboard USS JOHN KING (DDG 3).

In December of 1967 Lieutenant Commander Elliot volunteered for duty in Vietnam, Where he served as Commanding Officer, PBR Squadron 57, operating in the Mekong Delta. Under his command, his squadron of river patrol boats achieved an outstanding combat record, served in several major riverine operations. On December 29, 1968 Lietenant Commander Elliot was killed in action while leading his squadron in a riverine interdiction mission.

Lieutenant Commander Elliot's awards include the Legion of Merit; the Bronze Star, the Purple Heart, the National Defense Service Medal, the Vietnam Service Medal with two bronze stars, the Vietnam Gallantry Cross with palm, the National Order of Vietnam (5th class), the Vietnam Campaign Ribbon, the Armed Forces Expeditionary Service Medal, and the U.S. Expeditionary Metal.

Mission of USS ELLIOT

USS ELLIOT (DD 967) is the fifth SPRUANCE class destroyer and the fourth to join the Pacific Fleet. Elliot is homeported in San Diego and assigned to Cruiser Destroyer Group Five and Destroyer Squadron Thirty One.

Design and build by Ingalls Shipbuilding Division of Litton Industries, in Pascagoula, Mississippi, ELLIOT is a member of the first major class of surface ships in the U.S. Navy to be powered by gas turbine engines. Four General Electric LM-2500 engines, marine versions of those used on DC-10 and C-5A aircraft, drive the ship at speeds in excess of 30 knots. Twin controllable-reversible pitch propellers provide ELLIOT with a degree of maneuverability unique among warships of her size.

A highly versatile multi-mission destroyer, ELLIOT is capable of operating independently or in company with Amphibious or Carrier Task Forces. Her overall length is 563 feet and she displaces 7800 tones. ELLIOT's primary mission is to operate offensively in an Antisubmarine Warfare role. ELLIOT's sonar, the most advanced underwater detection and fire control system yet developed, is fully integrated into a digital Naval Tactical Data System, providing the ship with faster and more accurate processing of target information. Integration of the ship's digital gun fire control system into the NTDS provides quick reaction in the performance of the ship's mission areas of shore bombardment, surface warfare actions, and antiaircraft warfare.

Ship's weapons include two MK 45 lightweight 5 inch guns, two triple barrel MK 32 torpedo tubes, an antisubmarine rocket (ASROC) launcher, and facilities for embarkation of antisubmarine helicopters. Space, weight, and electrical power reservations have been allocated in the design of the ship to provide for the addition of future weapons systems and enable ELLIOT to keep abreast of future technology.

Crew comfort and habitability are an integral part of ELLIOT's design. Berthing compartments are spacious and the ship is equipped with amenities not usually found aboard destroyers, including a crew's library, lounge, hoppy shop, and gymnasium. Automated weapons and engineering systems permit operation of the ship, the size of a World War II light cruiser, by a reduced crew of 18 officers, 17 chief petty officers and 220 enlisted.

ELLIOT is one of the world's most modern destroyers, possessing advanced propulsion system and fully integrated combat system, with space and weight reservation available to ensure a formidable seaborne platform well into the future.

Decommissioned on December 2, 2003, the ELLIOT subsequently joined the mothball fleet in Pearl Harbor, HI. Stricken from the Navy list on April 6, 2004, the ELLIOT was finally sunk as a target on June 24, 2005, during Talisman Saber 2005, a joint exercise of US and Australian Naval forces in the Coral Sea.



a line

Anchored here Home Next


a line

This page was last updated on April 6, 2013